Past Exhibitions

Embodiment

30 Years of Sculpture by Susan Low-Beer

September 23 to December 31, 2018

Place of Becoming, Installation at the Art Gallery of Algoma, 2016, Susan Low-Beer.

Co-curated by Jasmina Jovanovic and Stuart Reid, Embodiment is a 30-year retrospective of ceramic sculpture by Governor General’s Award-winning artist Susan Low-Beer. The exhibition examines more than three decades of the artist’s practice. Recurring themes include identity and mortality as well as the simultaneous power and vulnerability of the body.

Also on view is an adjoining exhibition of new works from Low-Beer’s Specimen series, curated by Sheila McMath.

Susan Low-Beer received her Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree at Mount Allison University and her Masters of Fine Arts in the United States at the Cranbrook Academy of Art with a major in painting. She has exhibited internationally in Europe, United States, Japan and Korea, as well as nationally in both juried and invitational exhibitions and has been the recipient of numerous grants and awards. In 1999 she received the Saidye Bronfman Award for Excellence in the Crafts and in 2000 was inducted into the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts. She currently teaches and works in Toronto.

Susan Low-Beer presented an artist talk on Saturday, September 22 at 7pm.

The exhibition is organized and circulated by the Art Gallery of Algoma and generously funded through the Department of Canadian Heritage, Museums Assistance Program. Nous reconnaissons l’appui financier du gouvernement du Canada.  

This exhibition has been made possible in
part by a contribution from
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Teapot by Judy Donaldson. Winner of the Craft Ontario Best in Show Award 2016.

EARTHBORN 2018
September 23 to December 16, 2018

Earthborn is an annual, juried exhibition of works by members of the Waterloo Potters’ Workshop, a non-profit co-operative organization celebrating its 50th Anniversary this year. Established in 1968, WPW is located in Waterloo Park and occupies the historic Jacob Eby farmhouse, which functions as a work/learn space for members and a teaching facility for the public. This year’s juror is Scott Barnim, a Dundas-based potter. Barnim obtained his MFA in Ceramics from the Cardiff Metropolitan University, School of Art and Design, Wales, and in 2016 received the lifetime achievement award from the City of Hamilton Arts Awards.

Participating artists’ artwork is accompanied by the work of past Juror’s, including 2018 Juror Scott Barnim. Juried artists: Rosemary Aicher, Anne Beyers, Carol Blake, Laurie Cowell, Judy Donaldson, Harriet Falk, Stephen Hawes, Hette Hilsdon, Jason L’Abbe, Claudia Lambert, June Macdonald, Joanne Makulski, Marlen Moggach, Trudy Schulz, Indira Singh, Stewart Smith, Connie Straicher, Jacqueline Tate, Eekta Trienekens, Cynthia Trombley, Dorothea Tutte, Nicole Waddick and Daphne Wang.

Earthborn reception and awards ceremony was held on Sunday, September 23 at 1:30pm.

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April 8 to September 2, 2018

Ruby, 2016, Irene Frolic. Photo: Rebekah D’Amboise Tremblay

The Journey (detail), 2018, Susan Edgerley

Then, Now and Next

Curated by Sheila McMath. 

The Gallery’s 25th Anniversary exhibition, Then, Now and Next is an invitational show featuring six acclaimed Canadian artists, Samantha Dickie, Susan Edgerley, Irene Frolic, Zachari Logan, Audie Murray and Peter Powning. The exhibition celebrates artists at various stages of their careers. Some have a long history with the Gallery; all are making their mark in contemporary ceramics and glass.

Established artists Susan Edgerley and Irene Frolic, both members of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts, use glass for its inherent metaphorical references to the ethereal qualities of life and its fragility. Their work also utilizes the poetic potential of glass to speak about the human condition and the ephemeral beauty of the natural world. Edgerley and Frolic were both participants in the Gallery’s inaugural exhibition and we are pleased to invite them back to celebrate their accomplished careers.

Fragmented Plate Pair – Bold, 2017, Peter Powning

All We Can Do Is Keep Breathing (detail), 2018. Samantha Dickie. Photo: Cathie Ferguson

Fountain (detail), 2013 (ongoing). Zachari Logan

Fragments of Language: Birch&Beads, 2016, Audie Murray

Artist Peter Powning, recipient of the Saidye Bronfman Award in 2006, is engaged in experimentation with many different materials including ceramic, glass, stone and bronze. Powning’s practice encompasses work at various scales from small vessels to large sculptural objects to a public installation. Powning is viewed as an inspirational leader for his study of the ‘elemental’ aspects of materials, his technical proficiency and the way that his practice appears to move fluidly and seamlessly among various media.Contemporary ceramic artist Samantha Dickie has received attention and acclaim for the quiet power of her installations. For this exhibition, Dickie will debut a new work made of over 1,000 porcelain components. Her work encourages viewers to carefully observe subtle variations of handmade objects and to pause in her immersive environments.

Zachari Logan and Audie Murray have been invited to participate in this exhibition to represent the expansive, interdisciplinary approach embodied by many ‘next‘ generation artists. Logan’s work, Fountain, is made of multiple, intricately sculpted ceramic flowers, accumulated and assembled into a monumental column. The artist adds new ceramic flowers each time he exhibits the work, continuing his meditations on mortality, memory and loss.

Audie Murray is a multi-disciplinary Métis artist who has received attention for her integration of floral bead work on common, everyday objects. In Murray’s work, Fragments of Language, viewers will be greeted in three languages – French, Cree and Michif. Murray’s work will encourage viewers to consider the simultaneous fragility and resilience of culture, language and nature.

An integral part of this exhibition is also the In Memoriam section, which features work from the Gallery’s collection, and pays tribute to the makers of ceramic, glass and enamel art who we have lost over the last 25 years.

The Opening Reception was held on April 8 at 2:00pm.
Irene Frolic presented an artist talk during the official preview of the exhibition on April 7 at 7:30pm. Zachari Logan presented an artist talk on July 4 at 7:00pm.

Watch both artist talks on Youtube:

Thank you to our funders and supporters:

 
 
     

The Estate of J. Douglas McCullough

Bill Poole & Louise Dzuryk

Randall Howard & Judy McMullan

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May 5 to September 2, 2018

Chronicle: 25 Years at the Canadian Clay & Glass Gallery

Curated by Tsukiko Keogh & Andrew Bucsis

Opening Reception for The Glass Canvas, April 17, 1994. Visitors contemplating stained glass work by Stuart Reid.

A Preview of the exhibition was held on Sunday, April 8 at 2:00 pm. The show runs until September 2, 2018.

Explore the archives of The Clay & Glass as it celebrate a quarter century of silica arts. Unearthed from the vaults, this exhibit reflects on 25 years of the people and events that have shaped the Gallery’s history.The exhibition is held at the City of Waterloo Visitor and Heritage Information Centre, located at 10 Father David Bauer Drive, Waterloo, ON.

This exhibition is made possible in part by contributions from:  

     

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January 14 to March 18, 2018

Trajectories

Curated by Sheila McMath

Steel Blue Gossamer Vases, 2017. Julia Reimer. Photo: John Dean

For the winter 2018 season, the Gallery presented an exhibition of the curated works of seven artists who won the RBC Award for Glass between 2008 and 2016. They are Benjamin Kikkert, Ito Laïla Le François, Aaron Oussoren, Julia Reimer, Brad Turner, Cheryl Wilson Smith, and Rachael Wong. The exhibition featured new work by these artists, illustrating the growth in their artistic practice and output stimulated by winning the prestigious award.

These artists, in addition to sharing the distinction of winning the RBC Award for Glass, also share a commitment to the exploration of glass as an experimental and seductive medium. While some of the artists in this exhibition made use of traditional glass manipulation techniques including casting, blowing, sandblasting and pâte de verre, others incorporated the investigation of 3D printing and digital manufacturing methods into their practice.

                               This exhibition has been made possible in part by a contribution from: 
The Kitchener and Waterloo Community Foundation – Musagetes Fund.

 

 

 

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Cultural Topographies:
The Complexities of History and Identity in Canada

April 9 to August 24, 2017

Curated by Julie René de Cotret

This exhibition featured concept-driven artworks in ceramic and glass that explore identity, culture and history in Canada. Exhibiting artists included: Ann Beam, Adrian Blackwell, Laurent Craste, Chris Curreri, Léopold L. Foulem, Mathieu Grodet, David R. Harper, Sarah Maloney, Kelly Mark, Nadia Myre, Tasman Richardson and Tim Whiten.

Watch this video by Terry O’Neill

These artworks are outstanding examples of the potential of ceramic and glass art works to examine the complexities of our culture, inspiring fresh perspectives and new considerations.

Some of the artists featured in this exhibition have chosen to focus on specific historical markers and some on the evolution of our cultural voices in their broader context demanding that we contemplate their origins. Every work highlights the complexity of our habitus and the inherent potential for our betterment. In doing so they further define our identity.

The hierarchical categorizations and divisions imposed between art and craft are re-examined in this exhibition. Léopold L. Foulem, whose conceptual ceramic practice is principal to the development of this exhibition, once said, “matter doesn’t matter”,  addressing the tendency of the art world, for example, to assign greater value to works made of bronze than to those in ceramic. The conceptual contributions of crafts to the arts are seldom recognized.

These artworks were selected for their aesthetic and conceptual value. In the context of this exhibition, the works embody the important contributions of craft concept to art, specifically in the fields of sculpture and installation. The craft concepts explored by these works are those of containment, and of the object as frame.

 

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January 15 to March 19 2017

Christopher Reid Flock: Integration/Disintegration


 

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Integration/Disintegration Cup Saucy #4, 2016. Christopher Reid Flock.

As an experimental ceramic artist, Christopher Reid Flock’s work is profoundly influenced by the significant time that he spent in Japan and the mentorship that he received from some of Canada’s most respected potters. Among other accolades, Flock was the recipient of the Winifred Shantz Award for Ceramics in 2014 and was shortlisted for the Gardiner Museum Permanent Sculpture Competition in 2016. Flock lives and has a studio in Hamilton, Ontario.

Although this ambitious exhibition included some works from Flock’s earlier career, it featured more prominently his large-scale, installation-based works that whimsically play with notions of function while merging rapid prototyping with classical clay process. Integration/Disintegration included six main bodies of Flock’s work.

A companion exhibition called Mentorship: Harvest, Flow, Ferment featured selected works by Flock’s most influential mentors, Bruce Cochrane, Diane Nasr O’Young and Kayo O’Young. Works for this exhibition have been borrowed from private collections across Canada as well as through a significant loan from the Art Gallery of Burlington.

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Fall Exhibition Season

September 18 to December 31, 2016

Lou Lynn: COMMON/unCOMMON TRACING WHEEL

The works presented in Lou Lynn: COMMON/unCOMMON reinterpret the familiar and ask viewers to reconsider the beauty inherently found in functional objects. This exhibition featured both previously exhibited works from the ‘utensil’ and ‘fastener’ series, and debuted several new works that reference simple domestic objects including buckles, clasps and textile tools.

Lou Lynn began exploring the sculptural potential of glass in the mid 1980’s. Inspiration for Lynn’s work has been drawn from an interest in archaic and industrial tools and artifacts. She has twice been nominated for the Governor General’s Award (Saidye Bronfman Award) and in 2010 was inducted into the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts (RCA). Lou Lynn lives and maintains a studio in Winlaw, British Columbia.

Lynn’s exhibition has received support from:

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Ione Thorkelsson: A Natural History of Utopias

fledglingsIone Thorkelsson: A natural history of Utopias features hybrid creatures, modified plant life and an accumulation of animal ‘bones’ made from glass casting that are beautiful and troubling. The works on view explore the consequences of human intervention in the natural world.

Ione Thorkelsson studied architecture at the University of Manitoba and later studied glass at the Sheridan College School of Design summer program. In 1973 she established a private studio. In 2007 she was inducted into the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts (RCA) and in 2010 she was awarded the Saidye Bronfman Award for Excellence in Fine Craft, one of eight Governor General’s Visual Arts awards.

Thorkelsson’s exhibition has received support from:

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Past Winners of the Shantz & RBC Awards

This exhibition features works from the permanent collection by previous winners of the RBC Award for Glass & Winifred Shantz Award for Ceramics. The 2016 Winners will be presented at the Awards Ceremony on Saturday, November 12

 

On Firm Ground: a reposition of being

September 16 to October 16, 2016beam_for-web
Foyer Gallery
Guest Curator, Patricia Deadman

An exhibition of a selection of ceramic works from the permanent collection of the Canadian Clay & Glass Gallery (CCGG) and the Woodland Cultural Centre (WCC) to coincide with the Mush Hole Project; a collaborative project with community members, partners and the University of Waterloo.

Artists: Ann Beam, Anong Beam, Peter Jones, Steve Smith, Leigh Smith and Santee Smith present ceramic works that rearticulate cultural values, readdress the notion of modernity and influences of the cultural legacy left behind by the residential school system.