Past Exhibitions

April 8 to September 2, 2018

Ruby, 2016, Irene Frolic. Photo: Rebekah D’Amboise Tremblay

The Journey (detail), 2018, Susan Edgerley

Then, Now and Next

Curated by Sheila McMath. 

The Gallery’s 25th Anniversary exhibition, Then, Now and Next is an invitational show featuring six acclaimed Canadian artists, Samantha Dickie, Susan Edgerley, Irene Frolic, Zachari Logan, Audie Murray and Peter Powning. The exhibition celebrates artists at various stages of their careers. Some have a long history with the Gallery; all are making their mark in contemporary ceramics and glass.

Established artists Susan Edgerley and Irene Frolic, both members of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts, use glass for its inherent metaphorical references to the ethereal qualities of life and its fragility. Their work also utilizes the poetic potential of glass to speak about the human condition and the ephemeral beauty of the natural world. Edgerley and Frolic were both participants in the Gallery’s inaugural exhibition and we are pleased to invite them back to celebrate their accomplished careers.

Fragmented Plate Pair – Bold, 2017, Peter Powning

All We Can Do Is Keep Breathing (detail), 2018. Samantha Dickie. Photo: Cathie Ferguson

Fountain (detail), 2013 (ongoing). Zachari Logan

Fragments of Language: Birch&Beads, 2016, Audie Murray

Artist Peter Powning, recipient of the Saidye Bronfman Award in 2006, is engaged in experimentation with many different materials including ceramic, glass, stone and bronze. Powning’s practice encompasses work at various scales from small vessels to large sculptural objects to a public installation. Powning is viewed as an inspirational leader for his study of the ‘elemental’ aspects of materials, his technical proficiency and the way that his practice appears to move fluidly and seamlessly among various media.Contemporary ceramic artist Samantha Dickie has received attention and acclaim for the quiet power of her installations. For this exhibition, Dickie will debut a new work made of over 1,000 porcelain components. Her work encourages viewers to carefully observe subtle variations of handmade objects and to pause in her immersive environments.

Zachari Logan and Audie Murray have been invited to participate in this exhibition to represent the expansive, interdisciplinary approach embodied by many ‘next‘ generation artists. Logan’s work, Fountain, is made of multiple, intricately sculpted ceramic flowers, accumulated and assembled into a monumental column. The artist adds new ceramic flowers each time he exhibits the work, continuing his meditations on mortality, memory and loss.

Audie Murray is a multi-disciplinary Métis artist who has received attention for her integration of floral bead work on common, everyday objects. In Murray’s work, Fragments of Language, viewers will be greeted in three languages – French, Cree and Michif. Murray’s work will encourage viewers to consider the simultaneous fragility and resilience of culture, language and nature.

An integral part of this exhibition is also the In Memoriam section, which features work from the Gallery’s collection, and pays tribute to the makers of ceramic, glass and enamel art who we have lost over the last 25 years.

The Opening Reception was held on April 8 at 2:00pm.
Irene Frolic presented an artist talk during the official preview of the exhibition on April 7 at 7:30pm. Zachari Logan presented an artist talk on July 4 at 7:00pm.

Watch both artist talks on Youtube:

Thank you to our funders and supporters:

 
 
     

The Estate of J. Douglas McCullough

Bill Poole & Louise Dzuryk

Randall Howard & Judy McMullan

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May 5 to September 2, 2018

Chronicle: 25 Years at the Canadian Clay & Glass Gallery

Curated by Tsukiko Keogh & Andrew Bucsis

Opening Reception for The Glass Canvas, April 17, 1994. Visitors contemplating stained glass work by Stuart Reid.

A Preview of the exhibition was held on Sunday, April 8 at 2:00 pm. The show runs until September 2, 2018.

Explore the archives of The Clay & Glass as it celebrate a quarter century of silica arts. Unearthed from the vaults, this exhibit reflects on 25 years of the people and events that have shaped the Gallery’s history.The exhibition is held at the City of Waterloo Visitor and Heritage Information Centre, located at 10 Father David Bauer Drive, Waterloo, ON.

This exhibition is made possible in part by contributions from:  

     

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January 14 to March 18, 2018

Trajectories

Curated by Sheila McMath

Steel Blue Gossamer Vases, 2017. Julia Reimer. Photo: John Dean

For the winter 2018 season, the Gallery presented an exhibition of the curated works of seven artists who won the RBC Award for Glass between 2008 and 2016. They are Benjamin Kikkert, Ito Laïla Le François, Aaron Oussoren, Julia Reimer, Brad Turner, Cheryl Wilson Smith, and Rachael Wong. The exhibition featured new work by these artists, illustrating the growth in their artistic practice and output stimulated by winning the prestigious award.

These artists, in addition to sharing the distinction of winning the RBC Award for Glass, also share a commitment to the exploration of glass as an experimental and seductive medium. While some of the artists in this exhibition made use of traditional glass manipulation techniques including casting, blowing, sandblasting and pâte de verre, others incorporated the investigation of 3D printing and digital manufacturing methods into their practice.

                               This exhibition has been made possible in part by a contribution from: 
The Kitchener and Waterloo Community Foundation – Musagetes Fund.

 

 

 

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Cultural Topographies:
The Complexities of History and Identity in Canada

April 9 to August 24, 2017

Curated by Julie René de Cotret

This exhibition featured concept-driven artworks in ceramic and glass that explore identity, culture and history in Canada. Exhibiting artists included: Ann Beam, Adrian Blackwell, Laurent Craste, Chris Curreri, Léopold L. Foulem, Mathieu Grodet, David R. Harper, Sarah Maloney, Kelly Mark, Nadia Myre, Tasman Richardson and Tim Whiten.

Watch this video by Terry O’Neill

These artworks are outstanding examples of the potential of ceramic and glass art works to examine the complexities of our culture, inspiring fresh perspectives and new considerations.

Some of the artists featured in this exhibition have chosen to focus on specific historical markers and some on the evolution of our cultural voices in their broader context demanding that we contemplate their origins. Every work highlights the complexity of our habitus and the inherent potential for our betterment. In doing so they further define our identity.

The hierarchical categorizations and divisions imposed between art and craft are re-examined in this exhibition. Léopold L. Foulem, whose conceptual ceramic practice is principal to the development of this exhibition, once said, “matter doesn’t matter”,  addressing the tendency of the art world, for example, to assign greater value to works made of bronze than to those in ceramic. The conceptual contributions of crafts to the arts are seldom recognized.

These artworks were selected for their aesthetic and conceptual value. In the context of this exhibition, the works embody the important contributions of craft concept to art, specifically in the fields of sculpture and installation. The craft concepts explored by these works are those of containment, and of the object as frame.

 

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January 15 to March 19 2017

Christopher Reid Flock: Integration/Disintegration


 

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Integration/Disintegration Cup Saucy #4, 2016. Christopher Reid Flock.

As an experimental ceramic artist, Christopher Reid Flock’s work is profoundly influenced by the significant time that he spent in Japan and the mentorship that he received from some of Canada’s most respected potters. Among other accolades, Flock was the recipient of the Winifred Shantz Award for Ceramics in 2014 and was shortlisted for the Gardiner Museum Permanent Sculpture Competition in 2016. Flock lives and has a studio in Hamilton, Ontario.

Although this ambitious exhibition included some works from Flock’s earlier career, it featured more prominently his large-scale, installation-based works that whimsically play with notions of function while merging rapid prototyping with classical clay process. Integration/Disintegration included six main bodies of Flock’s work.

A companion exhibition called Mentorship: Harvest, Flow, Ferment featured selected works by Flock’s most influential mentors, Bruce Cochrane, Diane Nasr O’Young and Kayo O’Young. Works for this exhibition have been borrowed from private collections across Canada as well as through a significant loan from the Art Gallery of Burlington.

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Fall Exhibition Season

September 18 to December 31, 2016

Lou Lynn: COMMON/unCOMMON TRACING WHEEL

The works presented in Lou Lynn: COMMON/unCOMMON reinterpret the familiar and ask viewers to reconsider the beauty inherently found in functional objects. This exhibition featured both previously exhibited works from the ‘utensil’ and ‘fastener’ series, and debuted several new works that reference simple domestic objects including buckles, clasps and textile tools.

Lou Lynn began exploring the sculptural potential of glass in the mid 1980’s. Inspiration for Lynn’s work has been drawn from an interest in archaic and industrial tools and artifacts. She has twice been nominated for the Governor General’s Award (Saidye Bronfman Award) and in 2010 was inducted into the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts (RCA). Lou Lynn lives and maintains a studio in Winlaw, British Columbia.

Lynn’s exhibition has received support from:

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Ione Thorkelsson: A Natural History of Utopias

fledglingsIone Thorkelsson: A natural history of Utopias features hybrid creatures, modified plant life and an accumulation of animal ‘bones’ made from glass casting that are beautiful and troubling. The works on view explore the consequences of human intervention in the natural world.

Ione Thorkelsson studied architecture at the University of Manitoba and later studied glass at the Sheridan College School of Design summer program. In 1973 she established a private studio. In 2007 she was inducted into the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts (RCA) and in 2010 she was awarded the Saidye Bronfman Award for Excellence in Fine Craft, one of eight Governor General’s Visual Arts awards.

Thorkelsson’s exhibition has received support from:

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Past Winners of the Shantz & RBC Awards

This exhibition features works from the permanent collection by previous winners of the RBC Award for Glass & Winifred Shantz Award for Ceramics. The 2016 Winners will be presented at the Awards Ceremony on Saturday, November 12

 

On Firm Ground: a reposition of being

September 16 to October 16, 2016beam_for-web
Foyer Gallery
Guest Curator, Patricia Deadman

An exhibition of a selection of ceramic works from the permanent collection of the Canadian Clay & Glass Gallery (CCGG) and the Woodland Cultural Centre (WCC) to coincide with the Mush Hole Project; a collaborative project with community members, partners and the University of Waterloo.

Artists: Ann Beam, Anong Beam, Peter Jones, Steve Smith, Leigh Smith and Santee Smith present ceramic works that rearticulate cultural values, readdress the notion of modernity and influences of the cultural legacy left behind by the residential school system.

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Outside In

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Part 1: May 28 to September 4
Part 2: July 10 to September 4

Curated by Sheila McMath

Outside In is comprised of two concurrent exhibitions. The first installation component is in partnership with CAFKA (Contemporary Art Forum Kitchener and Area) in their 2016 Biennial CAFKA.16: What we do together that we can’t do alone. Artists Rory MacDonald; Jasna Sokolovic & Noel O’Connell of Dear Human; Orest Tataryn; and Vanessa Yanow in collaboration with John Tinholt have created site-specific installations in public spaces in close proximity to the Gallery. The second installation component features related work by the same artists in the Gallery space.

Rory MacDonald’s blue lovers no landscape turns the Silver Lake drainage area into a real-life physical incarnation of the Blue Willow Pattern, an 18th century china pattern containing specific motifs including a fence, body of water, and a pair of flying birds. MacDonald references these elements of the pattern with ceramic birds and a banner along the fence located beside the Gallery. The location and relationship of both components draw attention to the body of water separating each work of art. MacDonald’s Gallery installation waterloo willow landscape, integrates landscape imagery found around the Gallery including the Grist Mill and Perimeter Institute.

Dear Human is a creative studio based in Montreal founded by artists Jasna Sokolovic and Noel O’Connell. Rooted in their common interests in craft traditions, sustainable art making and unconventional material use, Dear Human has subtly infiltrated the Waterloo Public Library with a work called Paperscapes. Their tableau of functional furniture and lighting is made entirely of recycled materials and clay and is situated in a niche on the second floor of the library overlooking the Gallery. The installation invites viewers to consider the materiality and functionality of designed objects and the tipping point of when design becomes art or vice versa. Dear Human’s Gallery installation titled, Or Something In Between, continues to blur these lines through a group of seemingly functional forms and materials, including a paper tile backdrop, titled, Horse Blanket, that resembles ceramic tiles with a traditional textile motif.

Orest Tataryn’s neon work; landscape colour field #17, is installed in a window at the Waterloo train station Visitor and Heritage Information Centre. This work responds directly to the landscape with whimsical gestures and bold bands of colour. Orest Tataryn is a founding member of the guerrilla art collective Skunkworks/Outlaw Neon. Working concurrently in two technical disciplines, neon lampworking and Venetian glass blowing, he elevates the reputation of neon light work in the world of art and design. He has created four neon installations designed for the unique spaces of the Donald & Pamela Bierstock Gallery and the Mutual Tower Gallery.

Vanessa Yanow works primarily with textiles, flame-worked glass and found objects. For the outside component of Outside In, Yanow, in collaboration with John Tinholt, has created By Hook or By Crook, a work inspired by an unfinished 1970s hooked rug. On the wall of Len’s Mill Store they have reimagined a new version of the abandoned rug as a flying carpet. Several photo-based works and a sculptural work from the same series are featured in the Gallery. In the photo-based work, the floral motif of the carpet ‘takes off’ to other adventures as it moves through several beautiful and idealized landscapes.

Images (clockwise from top): blue lovers no landscape (concept drawing), Rory MacDonald, landscape colour field #17, Orest Tataryn, By Hook or By Crook (detail), Vanessa Yanow and John Tinholt, Paperscapes, Dear Human

 

About CAFKA:
Contemporary Art Forum Kitchener and Area is a non-profit, artist-run organization that presents a free biennial exhibition of contemporary art in the public spaces of the City of Kitchener and across the Region of Waterloo. Between exhibitions and throughout the year CAFKA promotes art education through its public tours and workshops, videos, public lectures and other ancillary programs and events.

The CAFKA biennial serves as the vehicle for the expression of the community of artists, arts professionals, art students and friends of contemporary art in the public spaces of the cities of Kitchener, Waterloo and Cambridge, Ontario. It is created to take the experience of contemporary art out of the gallery, to present it as a critical and integral part of community life, and to make that experience accessible to everyone in the Region. The exhibition is curated to engage public discourse around issues of public and private space, bringing groundbreaking artists from around the world to contribute to the discussion. CAFKA is committed to working with local technology companies to support new and experimental work in visualization and communication projects and to develop exploratory humanistic content for existing visualization systems.
 

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Earthborn

Earthborn is the annual, juried exhibition of work by members of the Waterloo Potters’ Workshop.  This cooperative group, established in 1968, is located in Waterloo Park and occupies the historic Jacob Eby farmhouse, which functions as a work/learn space for members and a teaching facility for the public. Earthborn was first held in 1976 at the Kitchener-Waterloo Art Gallery and has been hosted at various local galleries over the past 40 years.

This year Earthborn will be juried by Carmela Laganse. Laganse received her BFA at the University of Manitoba and her MFA at Ohio University. She has worked, taught and exhibited in Canada, Europe and the US. Her work was recently featured in Close Quarters at The Clay & Glass in winter 2016.

Art4teens

A small group of dedicated teens has been working since November 2015 on an exhibition of ceramic and glass works. Please join us as we celebrate the creativity and commitment of these young artists. Learn more about art4teens here.

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March 20 to June 26, 2016

Tributaries

Midway ‘twixt earth and heaven

 

Beam_Whale of our being

Whale of Our Being, 2003. Carl Beam

The exhibition, Tributaries, embraces the elements of earth, fire and light, foundations of Indigenous ideology. Contemporary artists of First Nations ancestry interpret a shared history, land and culture through installation, photography and sculpture informed by traditional knowledge, language, social constructs and protocol and styles of art and architecture.

The theme of this exhibition is inspired by Carl Beam’s Whale of Our Being, a work from the Canadian Clay & Glass Gallery’s permanent collection. In Tributaries, his glazed stoneware pot serves as a point of departure in the exploration of the relationship between people and the land. The selected artists represent diverse practices, histories and regions and their works present a selection of various materials such as porcelain, stoneware, bronze, wood, textile and glass accompanied by digital photographs, prints and drawings. The viewer is invited to experience the work presented within a holistic approach that engages one to enter the discussion at any given point of reference.

Artists include: KC Adams, Rebecca and Kenny Baird, Carl Beam, Nadia Myre, Marianne Nicolson, Greg Staats, Members of the Smith Family Pottery

Tributaries weaves personal and collective experience and memory with Issues that confront identity, commodity, tolerance and environmental management as these become fodder for reclamation and resilience.

This exhibition is generously supported by:

Ontario Arts Council – Aboriginal Curatorial Projects and F.K. Morrow Foundation

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January 17 to March 6, 2016

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City of Dreams (detail) 2013. Karine Giboulo
Secret Citadel video still2 2013 Graeme Patterson
Secret Citadel (detail) 2013. Graeme Patterson
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Debaser (detail), 2015. Carmela Laganse

Close Quarters

Join us for the Opening Reception on Sunday, January 17 at 2pm, with remarks at 2:30.

This exhibition is made possible in part by a contribution from Good Foundation Inc.

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Curated by Sheila McMath

It is often an artist’s job to tell stories and to create new and alternate ‘worlds’. Close Quarters, brings together the work of three accomplished Canadian artists, Karine Giboulo, Carmela Laganse and Graeme Patterson, based on their shared interest in storytelling and their use of the diorama format. The diorama format, though perhaps we didn’t call it that as children, is familiar to us all. It is linked to our experiences of the miniature world of childhood and play. We understand the world of dollhouses and train sets. We remember the stories that unfolded as we became characters, gave them voices, and participated in ‘playing out’ various scenarios.

The complex worlds created by Giboulo, Laganse and Patterson, featured in this exhibition, invite our interaction and careful attention. As viewers, we place ourselves in the mindset of imaginative childhood play. If we can find this openness, this receptivity to the work, it reveals more than what we initially see.  It comments on the complexity with which children see the world — through the lens of memory and the perspective of adulthood.

Read Sally McKay’s essay on Carmela Laganse’s Debaser here.

Artist Statements and Biographies:

Karine Giboulo creates colourful miniature worlds in which depictions of reality and flights of fancy mingle. Her intricate sculpted scenes use pathos and humour to comment on the human condition and issues such as globalization, consumerism and the environment. The use of bright colours and the personification of animals give her work a childish and naive imprint which belies the often serious subject matter. The characters in Giboulo’s narratives maintain dignity in difficult circumstances and her critique of society and human nature is couched in playfulness. Karine Giboulo has participated in solo and group exhibitions, including the New York Pulse Contemporary Art Fair in March 2009, at which she won the IMPULSE second prize — a competition including emerging artists from all over the world. Her work is included in Montreal Museum of Fine Arts’ collection (Québec, Canada) and the 21C Museum’s collection (Kentucky, US).

Perception and embodied experience are Carmela Laganse‘s ongoing interests — more particularly, material relationships and intersection of meanings garnered from pop culture, objects, social structures and language. She enjoys unearthing the connectedness among the seemingly incongruous. Her work disrupts visual tropes, creates and explores odd relationships, and subtly satirizes underlying ideologies that exist in our entangled material and visual cultures. Carmela builds interactive objects or modular environments that playfully encourage the integration of physical, emotional, intellectual, and ritualistic processes. Her current work “Debaser” is a multidimensional fabricated interactive environment that was catalyzed by personal loss and informed by 80’s arcades, construction methods, science fiction, video-game environments and the act of veneering. The dollhouse-scale environments invite the exploration of clustered pseudo sci-fi spaces cued by doorways and mediated views of interior spaces accessible through cameras and LCD monitors. “Debaser” is a series of subtly destabilizing environments in which Laganse playfully questions the deficits of her perception and creates an opportunity to “do-over” provoking exploration and various ways of perceiving/experiencing space.  Carmela Laganse is originally from Winnipeg, Manitoba and currently lives and works in Hamilton, Ontario. She received her MFA at Ohio University and has worked, taught and exhibited in Canada, Europe and the US.

Originally from Saskatoon, Graeme Patterson now lives in Sackville NB. His intention as an artist is to bring the viewer in to the world of play he inhabits, while creating miniature environments based on personal memories and experiences. Graeme’s practice stems from a self-taught method of producing stop-motion animations, but has expanded into building large video/sculptural installations. These installations consist of animation, sculptural models, robotics, sound, music, and some interactive elements. Graeme’s inspiration comes from a desire to constantly develop an alternate reality that stimulates reflective engagement with universal themes of longing, loss, and recovery. Since graduating from Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (NASCAD) in 2002 his work has shown nationally and internationally including several solo exhibitions at significant Canadian art galleries. Some of his recent accomplishments include; 2012 Canada Council for the Arts Victor Martyn Lynch-Staunton Award (media arts), Atlantic finalist for the 2014 and 2009 Sobey Art Award, finalist for the 2010 Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia Masterworks Arts Award, and a 2011 Juno award nomination for album package of the year. Graeme recently completed a new body of work entitled “Secret Citadel” which is currently exhibiting as a national solo tour.