Past Exhibitions

2013

WAR: Light Within/After the Darkness

September 22, 2013 – March 16, 2014
Curated by Christian Bernard Singer

Cohen BRUNET-NEUMANN RAVEK
Hanging Forest, Chari Cohen Caucus: Émergence, Hélène Brunet-Neumann The Miracle of the Three Sisters, Oded & Pamela Ravek

WAR: Light Within/After the Darkness

WEISSMAN-WILKS
Untitled, Claire Weissman-Wilks
MCKENZIE
Departed, Mary McKenzie
DONEFER
Todesmärche Revisited, Laura Donefer
POPLAWSKI
Dreaming Tree, Tina Poplawski

The Holocaust was of such an inconceivable horror and magnitude that the world vowed never to let such a thing happen again. This appropriate moral stance was codified in 1948 through the universal acceptance of international laws defining and forbidding genocide. Notwithstanding this global resolve, since World War II, genocides have occurred in Bosnia, Cambodia, Laos, Burundi, East Timor, Equatorial Guinea, Congo and Rwanda. The reverberations of all these unimaginable atrocities continue to be felt today.

The Canadian Clay and Glass Gallery presents an exhibition featuring seven contemporary art projects that directly respond to the Holocaust and to other atrocities committed during World War II. Specifically,  this exhibition explores the spirit of resistance, survival, hope and beauty through the works of Hélène Brunet Neumann, Chari Cohen, Laura Donefer, Mary McKenzie, Tina Poplawski, Oded and Pamela Ravek and Claire Weissman Wilks.

Poignantly powerful, yet inspiring and beautiful, the artworks evoke the realities faced by Jews and other innocent populations during the war – some of which were inspired by family stories. For instance, Mary McKenzie has created an installation of a portion of a life-sized house that was abandoned in a hurry. In this work, it is unclear whether the residents ran to hide in the forest or were forcibly removed. Chari Cohen evokes the forests in which Jewish partisans and other resistance fighters hid and operated against German occupation. This major installation of suspended porcelain trees hovers over a cracked earth platform that contains seedlings that will grow into the trees over the course of the exhibition. Laura Donefer’s installation of cast glass footprints – some taken from actual Holocaust survivors, tells the story of the forced death marches of concentration camp prisoners by the Nazis as the Allied forces closed in. Oded and Pamela Ravek have created a sculptural glass memorial to the six million Jews murdered during the Holocaust. The sculpture is also a tribute to Oded’s mother and her two sisters who miraculously survived the horrors of Auschwitz-Birkenau. Tina Poplawski’s installation references the emotional reverberations caused by the enforced displacement of people from their homes by violent military assaults. Her grandfather was executed by the NKVD (the former KGB) and all of his known relatives were sent to the Gulags. Like the Nazis, the NKVD was responsible for mass extrajudicial executions, mass deportations of entire nationalities and operated its own system of forced labour camps. Claire Weissman-Wilks’ sculptures and drawings, depicting love, kindness, compassion, caring and protection, were inspired by the personal journal of Etty Hillesum.  Hélène Brunet-Neumann’s Caucus: Émergence, an installation of figurative sculptures created out of unfired clay and straw, represents an international council of peace. Installed in the Gallery’s courtyard, the sculptures will slowly disintegrate during their exposure to the elements – reminding us that we do indeed forget.

Complementary exhibition programming includes: What If? Degenerate Art in the Permanent Collection. The Permanent Collection of the Canadian Clay and Glass Gallery comprises nearly 1,000 contemporary artworks created by artists who continue to produce and exhibit. This exhibition asks the question, “what if the Nazis had won the war and the Third Reich had spread throughout the western world ?” In response, we have identified key artworks from our collection that would have been deemed degenerate by the Nazis because the artists who created them are either Jewish, ethnically ‘undesirable,’ gay, or are political dissidents. The exhibition includes works by Jeannot Blackburn, Judy Chicago, Laura Donefer, Léopold L. Foulem, Irene Frolic, Marilyn Levine, Richard Millette, and Jack Sures.

Memorial Project: One of the elements in the exhibition which has resonated with gallery viewers is a banner that memorializes over 60 well-known Jewish visual artists, writers, musicians, composers, theatrical performers, entertainers and intellectuals who all died either in or while in transit to concentration camps or extermination camps. While this list is incomplete, given the monumental task that would be require in order to research the thousands of artists murdered by the Nazis, it is nevertheless an extremely moving account of their lives, of their contributions to humanity and of the abhorrent and shameful events that led to their deaths.

 

 

Click here for The Waterloo Chronicle’s coverage of the exhibition.
Click here for The Canadian Jewish New”s coverage.
Click here for blogger Katie Parkes’  experience of the exhibition.

 

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June 22 to September 1, 2013

These exhibitions were made possible in part by grants from Good Foundation Inc. and The Kitchener and Waterloo Community Foundation – Musagetes Fund.

Marie A. Côté: Of Vessels and Voices
June 27 to September 1, 2013
Curated by Christian Bernard Singer

Opening Reception June 27 • 7 pm

The upcoming solo exhibition by Quebec artist Marie Côté, consists of several ceramic art and sound installations and includes a series of clay drawings on paper. At the heart of the exhibition is a sound installation that she produced in Inukjuak, Nunavik, over the summer of 2011. Production was made possible through a grant and an artist-in-residence program subsidised by the Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec, Aumaaggiivik (Nunavik Arts Secretariat), the Kativik Regional Government, and Air Inuit.

In developing the installation, she worked with eight throat singers who sang with, and into, porcelain bowls that were made specifically for the occasion. She recorded their chants in four different locations: at the Avataq Cultural Institute, in the community family centre Sungirtuivik, in a traditional Inuit inter-seasonal dwelling called a qarmaq and in a house that served as her own temporary residence. Along with the music, the recordings also included the conversations between the singers, the repetition of particular melodic motifs, and the ambient sounds of everyday life in the north.

Côté initially got the idea of singing and bowls when she heard Inuit singers in a concert given by the Montreal Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Maestro Kent Nagano. She was intrigued by the proximity between the singers’ mouths when singing and later asked one of them why were they so close to one another. The singer explained: “it’s because of the echo.” This simple answer suddenly propelled Côté’s research into the world of Inuit vocal ‘games’ and inspired a ceramic installation that could replicate this very echo, full of its original reverberation and resonance.

The installation includes four porcelain elements or diffusers that play back the recordings through hidden speakers. When, by chance, one of the throat singer’s voices finds itself in harmony with the resonance of a bowl, the sound seems to spin and elevate itself in a gyratory movement that coincides perfectly with the roundness of the bowls. And within this same moment and space, the bowls and voices evoke a little bit of the North’s colour and intonation.

Marie A. Côté has been exhibiting regularly since 1986 and her works can be found in many public art collections, including the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, the Canada Art Bank, the collection of the Musée national des beaux-art du Québec, the Loto-Québec collection, the Daniel Weetaluktuk Memorial Museum and Cultural Transmission Centre collection, in Inukjuak, as well as in many private collections. This represents the first opportunity for Ms. Côté to produce a major solo exhibition outside of Quebec.

 

Invisible Streams: As Above, So Below
June 27 to September 1, 2013

Engerer923b-web

Invisible Streams: As Above, So Below, by Alfred Engerer, is an installation of hand-blown neon tubes that evokes the unseen energies of air currents, underground streams and ‘streams of consciousness.’

First commissioned by the Canadian Clay and Glass Gallery for its presentation at Scotiabank Nuit Blanche 2012 in Toronto, Engerer’s experience-driven installation of hand-blown neon tubes and found neon signage was suspended within the canopies of several trees at First Canadian Place Park in the heart of Toronto’s financial district. Over one million people attended Scotiabank Nuit Blanche 2012 over a 12-hour period that began on September 29 at 7:03 pm to sunrise.

For the Scotiabank Nuit Blanche installation, lines of vibrantly coloured undulating light and found letters, logos and symbols moved through several trees, converging in a whirlwind of activity around one central tree. The work emulated the inner ring structures within the tree trunks and evoked the idea of air currents and the evidence of normally unseen energies travelling through urban and rural locations. Engerer teamed up with Orest Tataryn of Outlaw Neon to create the work.

Invisible Streams: As Above, So Below will be on view in the Mutual Group Tower Gallery at the Canadian Clay and Glass Gallery from June 27 to September 1, 2013. Once again the installation will illustrate these unseen energies while also making direct reference to Laurel Creek, the underground stream flowing under Uptown Waterloo’s city centre. Laurel Creek begins in the Township of Wellesley, flows into Waterloo, rests in Silver Lake before making its way beneath the Gallery, continuing on underground past King Street, until it emerges again at City Hall. It then runs north-east until it eventually reaches the Grand River.

Read what Rob Reid wrote about the exhibitions by going to The Record or download a PDF of the article by clicking here.

Don’t Miss:

exhibit2Speaking the Inuit Way
By the Canadian Language Museum
June 27 to September 1, 2013

Speaking the Inuit Way serves as an introduction to viewers south of the Arctic on the diversity of the Inuit language. Through an examination of different writing systems, regional differences and modern revitalization efforts, the exhibition will showcase the spectrum of dialects that comprise the Inuit language and will illustrate how language reflects historical and contemporary Inuit culture and identity.

Wilson Lounge, New College
University of Toronto
40 Willcocks Street
Toronto, Ontario
March 28 to April 11, 2013
Museum of Inuit Art
207 Queen’s Quay West
Toronto, Ontario
April 14 – May 12, 2013
University of Victoria
University Centre Lobby
June 1-8, 2013
Canadian Clay and Glass Gallery
25 Caroline Street North
Waterloo, ON
June 27 – September 1, 2013
CLM_Logo_web

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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March 28 to June 16, 2013

"Urban Rebutia" by Patsy Cox Distillations and Eruptions

Curated by Christian Bernard Singer and Priscilla Hollingsworth
March 28 to June 16, 2013

Opening Reception: Thursday, March 28, 2013 at 7:00 pm. Everyone welcome.

Distillations and Eruptions is an exhibition of five large-scale ceramic installations by artists Tina Aufiero (USA), Patsy Cox (USA), Priscilla Hollingsworth (USA), Catherine Paleczny (ON) and Diana Lynn Thompson (BC).

Each of the artists has built an installation composed of dozens to thousands of parts – each work creating its own overall cumulative effect that also underscores a sense of natural organization. Clay bodies range from earthenware to porcelain and some of the artists have used additional materials and processes such as drawing and painting, photography, and digital media.

Distillations in the exhibition title refers to the process of ‘editing’ an artwork until one has reached its core essential. Meanwhile, eruptions are the unforeseen occurrences such as the accidents that occur during the creative process which, in turn, might inspire new creative directions.
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The Last Glass Show (the NEXT glass show)

The Last Glass Show (the NEXT glass show) is a Glass Art Association of Canada member exhibition curated by Ryan Legassicke. The exhibition offers a glimpse into the ideas and efforts that in many ways define the Canadian glass community from coast to coast.

Organisé par Ryan Legassicke, La dernière exposition de verre (La prochaine exposition de verre) est une présentation de L’Association de verre d’art du Canada. L’exposition propose des différentes idées et approches techniques du verre tout en représentant la diversité créatrice des verriers canadiens d’un océan à l’autre.

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ART-O-MATIC: Art Meets New Technologies

October 28, 2012 to March 17, 2013

Today, when we hear of artists working with new technologies, we might imagine kinetic, interactive, or computer-activated works, but both the brush and throwing wheel were once considered new technologies.

This exhibition explores object scanning, computer-generated form manipulation and 3-D printing, all of which embody Rapid Prototyping technology. While some artists switch back and forth between analogue and digital tools, others work exclusively in digital formats. Either way, these artists are experiencing a massive shift in the way they approach their studio practice both physically and conceptually. Coming from both Canada and the USA, the artists in this exhibition are at the forefront of creating new forms and inventing a new relationship to art and art-making.

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The Collection of Winifred Shantz

Thanks to a generous donation from the Estate of Winifred Shantz, we recently acquired 50 ceramic, glass and enamel works for our Permanent Collection. Winifred Shantz was the Gallery’s most important patron and a hugely significant contributor to arts in Kitchener/Waterloo. The works on view demonstrate her passion for collecting signature works by Canadian masters and for supporting growth through opportunity in careers of numerous promising emerging artists with such initiatives as the Winifred Shantz Award for Ceramics.

The Collection of Winifred Shantz includes works by John Chalke, Dale Chihuly, Dan Crichton, Laura Donefer, Joe Fafard, Irene Frolic, Robert Held, Alan Perkins,  Ann Roberts, Fay Rooke, Bernard Séguin Poirier, Jack Sures,  and Valeri Timofeev.

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Susan Collett: New Works from the Permanent Collection

By its very nature, clay lends itself well to organic explorations of the body and of the natural world. From the Permanent Collection, some of which were recently donated by the Estate of Winifred Shantz, will be several works from the Labyrinth series by Susan Collett.

While these recent paper clay constructions may suggest the idea of the vessel, they are instead undulating almost living organisms that appear to be growing, expanding – perhaps even breathing. This sense of a living organism is punctuated by the work’s perceived fragility as Collett invites us to explore its “shaled and ledged formations – a metaphor for life’s lessons.”

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2012

Tactile Desires: The Work of Jack Sures
July 15 to October 14, 2012

Curators: Timothy Long, MacKenzie Art Gallery & Virginia Eichhorn, Tom Thomson

Organized by the MacKenzie Art Gallery and the Tom Thomson Art Gallery. This project has been made possible in part through a contribution from the Museums Assistance Program, Department of Canadian Heritage.

This exhibition is the first retrospective of one of Canada’s most significant ceramists—a multi-faceted figure whose exuberant and sensuous work traverses the categories of craft, fine art and public monument. In addition to offering a comprehensive look at his work from the early 1960s to the present, this retrospective will address his important role and influence as an educator and mentor.

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Invisible Streams – As Above, So Below 

September 29, 2012

Invisible Streams: As Above, So Below, was an experience-driven installation of hand blown neon tubes and found neon signage suspended within the canopies of trees at First Canadian Place. Lines of vibrantly coloured undulating light and found letters, logos and symbols move through the trees, converging in a whirlwind of activity around a central tree. The work emulates the inner ring structures within the tree trunks and evokes the idea of air currents and the evidence of normally unseen energies travelling through urban and rural locations.

 

Read U Waterloo’s Catherine Vendryes coverage of the exhibition by clicking for the PDF here.

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Man or Myth? Explorations on Masculinity
May 4 to June 30, 2012

Three artists explore their personal relationships with the traditional notions of masculinity and how this identity can be a fluid one. The Croatian-born Srdjan Segan’s 40-foot elongated clay site-specific sculpture and 30-foot long drawings of the ‘every-human’ pulls from his war experiences while a refugee during the Serbo-Croatian war. Meanwhile, Clint Neufeld’s series of slip-cast ceramic auto transmissions and parts are decorated with delicate Rococo filigree and ornamentation. Finally, the infamous ceramic sculptor, Léopold L. Foulem unveils his latest works, Bibelots in which the figurine—a trivial cultural object—powerfully challenges the status quo.

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Fusion/Fireworks 2011
May 4 to June 30, 2012

Fireworks 2011, the biennial juried travelling exhibition of FUSION: The Ontario Clay and Glass Association, that has come to symbolize the best in contemporary clay and glass by its members, will be on view in the Douglas Wright Gallery.

Earthborn 2012
May 4 to June 30, 2012

Juried by ceramic artist and potter Bill Reddick, the Waterloo Potters’ Workshop features its members best works in its exhibition, Earthborn 2012.

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Ann Roberts: With Both Fear and Intrepid Enthusiasm
January 29 – April 22, 2012
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50-year retrospective by the South African born, Waterloo Region ceramic artist and sculptor, Ann Roberts. The exhibition will survey various stages of the artist’s career beginning from her early functional work to her highly engaging sculptures influenced by mythology and infused with literary sensibility.  Her work has explored the female form, often retelling myth from a feminine point of view.  “Myth is something you play with,” she said once.

The Art of Mentoring : A Legacy
Complementing Ann Roberts’ 50-year retrospective exhibition as a ceramist and sculptor, this companion exhibition celebrates a small part of her legacy as teacher and mentor.

The Ann Roberts Catalogue is now available for purchase at the Clay & Glass Gallery Shop!

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TERRA NOVA: Canadian ‘Ground-Breakers’ in Ceramic Art
October 21, 2011 to Jan 15, 2012

Ceramic arts may date back well over 25,000 years but contemporary artists continue to redefine both its material and conceptual possibilities. Terra Nova brings together some of Canada’s most innovative contemporary ceramic artists in a fresh celebration of beauty. Ranging from sculpture and thwarted functional pieces to mixed-media installations, these artists’ unique approaches, both materially and conceptually, will delight and astound viewers. Artists in the exhibition are Susan Collett, Laurent Craste, Jeremy Hatch, Sin-ying Ho, Claude Miceli, Julie Moon, Ann Mortimer, and Catherine Paleczny.

10 Artists / 10 Years: Surveying work by Winifred Shantz Award for Ceramics Recipients

Celebrating the 10th Anniversary of the Winifred Shantz Award for Ceramics, this exhibition surveys key works created by winners of this prestigious award and demonstrates what is made possible when creativity is supported by visionary philanthropy. The Winifred Shantz Award for Ceramics supports highly promising early career professional ceramic artists to conduct intensive research at a pivotal moment in their careers. Works created before and after having won the Award will be on view. Past winning artists are: Susan Collett (Toronto), Laurent Craste (Montreal), Marc Vincent Egan (Toronto), Joan Bruneau (Lunenburg), Kate Hyde (Warsaw, ON), Ying-Yueh Chuang (Toronto), Rory MacDonald (Regina), Kasia Piech (Hamilton), Jasna Sokolovic (Vancouver), and Brendan Tang (Kamloops).

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2011

Reflective Natures and Transparent Landscapes
July 10 to October 2, 2011

An exhibition of glass and ceramic sculptures and installations that poetically reinterpret our traditional views of nature at a time when human impact on the natural world has never been greater, and our relationships with an ever-changing landscape, never more fluid. Sculptors and eco-artists are Joan Brigham (US), Claire Brunet (QC), Jennifer Bueno (USA), Alfred Engerer (ON), André Fournelle (QC), Sadashi Inuzuka (BC), Benjamin Kikkert (ON), Catherine Paleczny (ON), and George Whitney (ON).

 

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Julie Oakes: Swounds
April 10-June 26th, 2011

For many years Julie Oakes has used spiritual narratives derived from Eastern iconography, she now turns her attention to biblical themes and our relationship to nature as the basis of her seven-part installation in glass, clay, and aluminum. Swounds addresses the fragility, authenticity, and poignancy of life
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At the heart of the exhibition is a flock of over 100 glass sparrows suspended from the Gallery’s ceiling. Each day, one sparrow will fall and smash, adding to a pile of broken glass which will grow throughout the exhibition. A second piece combines a painting of an ark and 50 pairs of hand-painted clay feet depicting various species. An additional five works complete Swounds, which explores with viewers the relationship between concepts of spirituality and the reality of earthly violence.

The Swounds Catalogue is now available for purchase at the Clay & Glass Gallery Shop!

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RCA Members Exhibition

April 10 to June 26, 2011

Tying in with the RCA conference (May 20 weekend), the Gallery is exhibiting new clay and glass works and works from the Permanent Collection by selected members of the Royal  Canadian Academy of Arts (RCA). Established in 1880, today’s Academy is composed of over 700 established professionals working across Canada in 20 visual arts disciplines; from painting and sculpture to architecture, design, fine craft, photography, and film making. Elected by their peers, members are recognized for their significant contribution through their work, to the visual arts in Canada.

Artist Credit: Penelope Stewart

While this exhibition does not comprehensively represent all of the RCA members working in Ceramics and glass, the exhibition presents new works by: Jane Buyers, Bruce Cochrane, Susan Collett, Sarah Link, Ann Mortimer, Penelope Stewart, and Wendy Walgate.

From our Permanent Collection are works by: Margot Ariss, John Chalke, Bruce Cockrane, Walter Dexter, Léopold Foulem, Irene Frolic, David Gilhooly, Steve Heinemann, Robert Held, Robin Hopper, Harlan House, Enid Sharon Legros-Wise, Mayta Markson, Richard Milette, Paula Murray, Peter Powning, Ann Roberts, Laurie Rolland, Maurice Savoie, Jim Thomson, and Ione Thorkelsson.

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Brash Sophistication: Two American Pop Artists Redefine Minimalism
January 16 – March 27, 2011

Curated by Christian Bernard Singer

Exhibition sponsored by the Estate of J. Douglas McCullough

Glitz, glitter, and ‘camp,’ facilitate the road to self-help; Facebook provides a platform for self-expression; the inherent conundrums of contemporary life battle with established dogmas;and how the morning cup of coffee or picking the right shoes can be meaningful solutions to leading a better life.These questions and others are explored in two joyful yet thought-provoking exhibitions byAmerican artists Jim Hake and Amanda Dumas-Hernandez.

Originally from Baltimore, Jim Hake recently moved to Toronto after living in Italy for 13 years where his joyful and compelling works are well known.In Now and Never, Hake’s figurative sculptures and mixed-media work playfully incorporate recognizable images and references in order to set the stage for a series of revelatory surprises. Using beauty, humour, and formal composition, Hake explores ideas around social interaction and identity, while communicating a profound sense of optimism that viewers will find disarming and highly engaging.

Amanda Dumas-Hernandez, a conceptual artist and self-professed southern belle from Atlanta,Georgia, will delight and awe viewers with her exhibition, Joy Ride: The Golden Path to Enlightenment and Happiness. Embracing beauty, kitsch, and ‘camp’ in her series of sculptures and installations, Dumas-Hernandez offers the potential for introspection and metaphysical experience through her glittery mandalas while also providing multiple insights into the ‘bumpy life’ experience with hilarious absurdity.

 

Photo credits for Brash Sophistication images:

Artist: Jim Hake, Title: Face of Toronto, Credit: Karl Griffiths-Fulton (top)

Artist: Amanda Dumas-Hernandez, Title: Self-Reflection, Credit: Karl Griffiths-Fulton (bottom)

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2010

Glass Factor: Luminaries in the Canadian Art Glass Scene
September 24th 2010 – January 2nd 2011
Curated by Christian Bernard Singer

Fire and flame – heat, combustion, and sweat. Like one possessed, the artist’s muse, fury, and obsession merge to commune with the scowling rays of intense heat – not a place for the timid. Into the belly of the tank – a cradle of the beginning and end of time – the artist dips the blowpipe to gather the honey-like substance with its colour of white gold. Shaping the translucent liquid into an egg, a human breath awakens life in the form of a bubble. Whether the glass blower works alone or enlists the help of others in a choreographed ballet of master, aides, and apprentices, the creative possibilities are just beginning. Either way, the making is an act of exploration, curiosity, courage, love, and a testament to the artist’s responsive oneness with the material.

Works By:

Brad Copping                      Laura Donefer                   Susan Edgerley                 Alfred Engerer                   Irene Frolic                        Catherine Hibbits
David James                       Michèle Lapointe              Lou Lyn                              Francis Muscat                  Susan Rankin                    Donald Robertson
John Paul Robinson          Tyler Rock                          Karl Schantz                     Orest Tataryn                     Ione Thorkelsson              Koen Vanderstukken

 

Image: Donald Robertson, “Ripple,” 2009, detail. Lost wax cast crystal, cut and polished. 7″ x 36″ x 7″.

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Casting & Slumping & Blowing…Oh My!
June 13 to September 12, 2010

Curated by Christian Bernard Singer

Bruce Taylor: Historic allusions that are unlinkable to any specific era, cultural references without geographical place, and unidentifiable purpose are thoughts that come to mind when confronted by Bruce Taylor’s imposing ceramic sculptures. His series of human-scale vessels, Lucid Dreaming, oscillates between relic and portent – vaguely familiar yet mysterious elusive. The familiar, however, lies in his inspiration of industry and a 4000-year history of ceramic anthropomorphic vessels.

 

Joni Moriyama: The artist’s work tells stories but with no fixed narrative. In fact, Moriyama only sets the stage and the viewer is required to create their own stories. In her series of cast ceramic works, A Mob of Meerkats, Joni Moriyama has captured a potent moment in a clan of meerkats — one of the most co-operative societies in the animal kingdom. These highly-socialized beings all share in the rearing of the young within their group — taking turns to feed, watching for predators and guarding against intrusion from other clans. Moriyama sets the stage for anticipation but its subject remains somehow elusive. In this installation, a mob of meerkats are all staring in one direction, intently focused on something they have just seen, heard, or sensed, yet whatever it is, remains beyond our awareness.

Alfred Engerer, An Alfred Experience: As a way of demonstrating various processes of blowing and casting glass using moulds, a portion of Alfred Engerer’s glass studio will be installed in the Gallery. The exhibition will explore various processes of casting glass from blowing, casting, slumping, ladling, etc into moulds. What kinds of moulds are used, the various options available, and how a variety of artists are using unique approaches to create work.  Engerer’s own work, some of his moulds, and technical examples showing the creation process from start to finish. The exhibition will be complemented by photos and videos showing Engerer and other artists in action with hot glass.

 

(top) Bruce Taylor, “Gilded Crucible,” detail, 2009. Ceramic, copper leaf, wood and casters. 66″x48″x34″

(right) Joni Moriyama, “Meerkat,” detail, 2010. Slip-cast earthenware. 19.25″ x 8.75″ x 4″

(left) Alfred Engerer, “City of Light,” 2010. Cast glass, silica sand, light box. 20″ x8′ x 3′. Photo Credit, Alfred Engerer.

 

 

Read what Rob Reid wrote about the exhibitions in The Record by clicking here for the PDF of the article.

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Perspectives of Innocence
March 28 to June 6, 2010

Michèle Karch-Ackerman: The artist draws upon her own experiences and her family history to bring us FOUNDLING. Karch-Ackerman’s previous work has focused on remembering and honouring the memories of children from past centuries who passed away at early ages. In this exhibition, she shifts her focus from young children to young unmarried women who, after becoming pregnant, found themselves seeking help from places like Misericordia, an institution originally established as a home for unwed mothers. This exhibition centres around the difficult decisions and societal pressures faced by women who found themselves in such a position. Karch-Ackerman uses textiles found in these homes to create clothing for infants as a way to relieve some of the shame felt by women who lived there, and draw us into the largely neglected world unwed mothers in Canada during the 20th century. Foundling, draws upon her own family’s story while set against a backdrop of more recent history of women who, when faced with an unexpected pregnancy, found solace and help through the Misericordia Homes.

 

Susan Low-Beer, State of Grace: Low-Beer’s interpretive clay sculptures of young children capture the buoyancy, movement, and lightness of innocent joyful exuberance. Yet, they are suspended in mid-air  – oscillating somewhere between jumping and landing – and time seems no longer relevant. They are in their own world of play and imagination, and their enigmatic expressions reinforce our inability to access their world – a dream world of childhood before rationality has managed to take root. Low-Beer’s intentional ambiguity about specifics such as race and gender adds much mystery, depth, and meaning.

Accompanying the installation are five other works from Low-Beer’s Force of the Moon’s Shell series. What began as a formal exploration of the circle, symmetry, texture, and transparency, evolved into a narrative revealing mysteries of the night moon.

Cristian Raduta, RHINOS: Romania is in a transitional period after 50 years of communism and its aftermath. Young artists are finding their voices by combining their individual views and experiences with the social and political environment and transferring these back into their work. Against this backdrop, Romanian artist Cristian Raduta likes to analyze the process of metamorphosis of widely-recognized forms into new esthetical dimensions. He is fascinated by what he terms “the confrontation of the bestiary” (a bestiary is a compendium of beasts made popular during the Middle Ages). His rhino sculptures hover over the realms of fables and myths, existing between their world and ours. Although whimsical and somewhat fantastical, yet seemingly timeless, they remain well-grounded and solid. They are Old World beasts that evoke earlier days when noble quests and mythological kingdoms informed rational thought.

 

 

(top) Michèle Karch-Ackerman, “Foundling,” label being stitched, 2010.

(left) Susan Low-Beer, “State of Grace,” detail. Installation View 2010. Various Dimensions.

(right) Cristian Raduta, “Rhinos,” 2007. Fibreglass, epoxy, paint, sand. 33″ x 20″ x 10″ each. Installation View.

 

Read Robe Reid’s take on the exhibition in The Record here (PDF).

 

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Introspective Expeditions: Journeys to the Self

January 17, 2010 – March 21, 2010

Jane Adeney offers us Transubstantiation: Fire and the Search for Meaning. Adeney is known for her installations and ceramic sculptures that focus on controlled states of transformation and alchemical metamorphosis, an idea that she explores here through the medium of clay. Her fascination with the clay’s various stages of being, (malleability, firing, and smoking) mirrors her own examination of the various stages of personal passage, renewal, and the cycle of transformation. In this exhibition, Adeney uses images of fire to explore the uniquely human search for transcendental meaning by focusing on fire’s symbolic properties. Her work explores human existence and the symbolic purification of fire, which is able to reach into the depths of our inner selves, touching the internal worlds of our desires and, possibly, our fears.

Sin-Ying Ho: In the 21st century, the forces of political, technological and economic globalization have resulted in the merging of people from many nationalities and cultures. Ho’s One World/Many Peoples illustrates the course of such an encounter between colliding cultures and eras. The deconstruction and reconstruction of objects is a visual demonstration of the transformation that occurs when time and cultures collide. Ho draws our attention to cross-cultural experience by combining apparently divergent elements, such as hand painted and digital images, into single works of art. In this exhibition, Ho juxtaposes fragments of various Eastern and Western forms and imagery to comment on contemporary postcolonial theory, which critiques Imperial Europe through the examination of issues such as slavery, migration, race, gender, and place.

Louise Pentz: Throughout the ages, there has been a tradition of representing women and motherhood as an iconographic image of “Women as Vessel.” Usually symbolizing the ideals of fertility, purity, and the nurturing caregiver, these representations were   as eternal yet lacked any human experiential dimension. In Broken … But Still Standing, Pentz uses smoke-fired ceramic sculpture to take us into a world of contradictions where mothering is a deeply personal journey full of on-going learning, teaching, and transformation. Pentz celebrates the strength of women throughout history, despite their often vulnerable positions. Here, women are represented as vessels of personal identity and experience, and our mothers’ legacies of strength, endurance, and faith inspire and guide our own individual journeys.

(top) Jane Adeney, “Controlled Burn,” 2007. Smoked-fired clay, glass, wood, findings, electrical and audio components. 15″ x 90″ x 90″

(right) Sin-Ying Ho, Various Works. Porcelain, hand-painted cobalt pigment and decal transfer glaze. Installation View, 2010. Photo Credit Wilhelm Nassau

(left) Louise Pentz, Various Works, Installation View, 2010

 

 

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2009

THE MASQUERADE 

October 15 2009- Jan. 10 2010

Aganetha Dyck: Inspired by the large white artificial wigs that were worn by our ancestors and the masks they carried or wore at festive balls, the artist wanted to explore how masquerades altered their guests’ behaviours – how ‘masking’ would have given them freedom to be different (or even pretend to be someone else entirely) – to dance, flirt, have engagements, and receive and give proposals – decent or otherwise. From the artist’s MMasked Ball Series.

Lindsay Craig: The artist’s installation of glass and porcelain sculptural dolls addresses issues of identity, femininity, and popular culture. Entitled Playing with Dolls, the series refers back to the artist’s childhood proclivities while carrying multiple conceptual layers from various and disparate sources that are open to a variety of interpretations as they incorporate influences of religious, mythological, and pop culture imagery.

Carole Epp: In A Collection of Innocent Crimes, Epp manipulates the figurative collectible into sculptures that are rich with narrative and metaphor. Each work is used as a tableau for the presentation of politically and socially charged subject matter and the collectible reference was in part due to its representation of aspects of childhood and nostalgia, kitsch, stereotypes, and most importantly – consumption.

(top) Aganetha Dyck, “Chess,” detail, 2008. Readymade porcelain figurine, wax, honeycomb. 24.13 x 33.02 x 17.78cm

(right) Lindsay Craig, “Pottery Shard Mask,” detail, 2007. Bronze, porcelain doll. 7″ x 9″

(left) Carole Epp, “They now saw what his idle hands could do,” detail, 2008. Ceramic, wood, & glass dome. 8″ x 5″

 

COSMOS: Cedric Ginart

The artist makes strange antique devices and contraptions. The unusual objects seem to exist somewhere between the worlds of science and the outrageously fantastic. Inspired by actual instruments that might have been used by Galileo, Copernicus, and Leonardo da Vinci, Ginart’s works appear humorous yet archaically functional. The works explore ideas about how humans observe and perceive the world around them. At the heart of the exhibition, are a series of 7 bells in which new planets are being ‘cultivated’ and viewers may witness their various stages of growth.

GILBERT POISSANT

Variations on Discs, Spirals, & Xuanjis

June 28th – October 4th, 2009

This exhibition presents Poissant’s study of different interpretations of the circle, ranging from small objects and vessels to large-scale installations and architectural work. Using the strong symbolism of the circle, this exhibition is infused with an original and metaphoric context.

 

FROM THERE TO HERE…FROM FAR & NEAR

From There to Here

April 19, 2009 – June 21, 2009

Waterloo becomes a meeting point for diversity and celebration of Canadian Ceramics in its next exhibit, FROM THERE TO HERE showcasing works of
arts FROM FAR & NEAR. Central Canada meets Western Canada in this exciting display of some of Canada’s most innovative potters and creative ceramic sculptors.

 


ANNIE E. BROWN: IN MEMORY

Annie E. Brown: In Memory

February 1, 2009 – April 12, 2009

This exhibition explored of past and present intersections; of mourning, loss, and meaning. How do we understand death and in what way is it different or similar from generations past? How can we mark and honour the passage of those we love; to remember them with a sense of love more than loss.

 

CESAR FORERO

Cesar Forero: Gamin (Juanito’s Story)

February 1, 2009 – March 1, 2009

Cesar Forero is an architect and artist. His work has been shown in the Americas and Japan. By using unconventional and recycled materials, common in deconstructed architecture, Forero’s work addresses societal issues. Interested in movement, his paintings and sculptures appear either in frozen mid-action or literally mechanically moving. View a Forero installation and feel a part of the story unfolding.

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2008

ORNAMENT

Lyndal Osborne, Christine Davis, Michelle Lapointe,

Tanya Lyons, Ted Gooden

September 21, 2008 – January 25, 2009

TOUCHED

Michael Jacob Ambedian, Aganetha Dyck, Stephen Hawes,

Mark Jaroszewicz, Tina Poplawski

June 15 To September 14, 2008

Denise Pelletier, Laura Donefer, Susan Edgerley

June 15 To September 14, 2008

MEANING MEMORY MILIEU

Mary Anne Barkhouse: Boreal Baroque

March 30 – June 8, 2008

Christian Bernard Singer: A Cabinet of Curiosities

March 30 – June 8, 2008

Sarah Saunders: Passages

March 30 – June 8, 2008

STRUCTURES

Ruth Chambers: Temporary Adornment

January 27 – March 23, 2008

Paul Matosic: Cutting Edge

January 27 – March 23, 2008

Vanessa Yanow: Crucial Minutae

January 27 – March 23, 2008

Waterloo Potters Workshop: 40th Anniversary

January 27 – February 10, 2008

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2007

Maurice Savoie: Pharos

September 9 – November 9, 2007

Judy Chicago: Chicago in Glass

September 9, 2007 – January 13, 2008

Donald Maynard: Falling to Pieces

September 9, 2007 – January 13, 2008

Yuichiro Komatsu: Spatial Juncture

September 9, 2007 – January 13, 2008

Works of Fiction: Lorne Beug, Victor Cicansky, Joe Fafard, David Gilhooly, Richard Gomez, Marilyn Levine, Maija Peeple Bright, Jack Sures

November 10, 2007 – January 13, 2008

Kai Chan: From Sea to See

June 10 – August 26, 2007

Joseph Hubbard: 25 Years of Provocative Questions

June 10 – September 1, 2007

Lou Lynn: Implements & Objects

June 10 – August 26, 2007

Deduction: Anong Migwans Beam & Susan Collett

June 10 – August 26, 2007

Jacqueline Berting: Frozen Moments

April 15 – June 3, 2007

Chris Dorosz: The Painted Room

April 15 – June 3, 2007

Miyuki Shinkai: Kokoro

April 15 – June 3, 2007

3,500 Years of Creative Work: Miracle of Glass Curated by Wilhelm Nassau

April 15 – June 3, 2007

Shary Boyle: Aspects & Excess

January 14 – April 8, 2007

Stuart Reid: Stumbling Home from Banff

January 14 – April 8, 2007

Robert Youds: small artifical fields

January 14 – April 8, 2007

Univ. of Waterloo Ceramic Students: Somewhere Over the Rainbow

January 14 – February 11, 2007

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2006

Paul Stankard: Death, Sex & God

September 10, 2006 – January 7, 2007

Jane Buyers and Mary Catherine Newcombe: Into the Woods

September 10, 2006 – January 7, 2007

Maija Peeples: Laughing Owl The Way

September 10, 2006 – January 7, 2007

Cara Driscoll, Louise Pentz & Steve Smith

Mutatione Mirabeli    September 10, 2006 – January 7, 2007

Josh Simpson: Visions of our Galaxy

June 4 – September 3, 2006

Ceramic Work from Rankin Inlet

June 4 – September 3, 2006

19th and 20th Century Paperweights from the Permanent Collection of the Canadian Clay & Glass Gallery

June 4 – September 3, 2006

Tim Whiten: ….as it is…. (French text)

April 9 – May 28, 2006

Tina Poplawski: Mandala Snowflake (French text)

April 9 – May 28, 2006

Jeremy Hatch: Tree House (French text)

April 9 – May 28, 2006

Calm, Cool & Collected: What is a Permanent Collection? (French Text)

April 9 – May 28, 2006

Brent Bukowski and Kathryn Ward: Fragile Nature

January 15 – April 2, 2006

Scott Silverthorn and Dick Averns: Neon

January 15 – April 2, 2006

Karina Guevin: Phantastique

January 15 – April 2, 2006

Cesar Forero: Las Farc Did It

January 15 – February 12, 2006

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2005

Wheel of Time: Historic and Contemporary Buddhist Artefacts

Sept 11, 2005 – Jan 8, 2006

Sand Mandala (French text)

 

Reading list on Buddhism

September 11, 2005 – January 8, 2006

Alex Yueng: Searching For Offering Hands (French text)

September 11, 2005 – January 8, 2006

Anita Rocamora: Vessel-Essence (French text)

September 11, 2005 – January 8, 2006

Peter Sloan: Layers (French text)

September 11, 2005 – January 8, 2006

Fireworks 2005 (French text)

May 27 – September 4, 2005

Contemporary First Nations Clay

May 27 – September 4, 2005

Earthborn from the Waterloo Potters’ Workshop

May 27 – September 4, 2005

Bruce Flowers: Clay Pride

May 27 – September 4, 2005

Cesar Forero: The Four Elements (French text)

May 27 – September 4, 2005

Christian Bernard Singer: Tessellated Anamnesis – Patterns For Unforgetting (German text)

March 20 – May 18, 2005

 

Graduate glass class from Sheridan College: The Breathing Room

March 20 – May 22, 2005

 

Alexandra McCurdy: The Ties That Bind

April 17 – May 22, 2005

 

Kasia Piech and Wendy Walgate: Symbol and Story – An Exploration of Faerie Tales (Spanish text) (German text)

January 9 – March 11, 2005

 

Vikky Alexander, Laura Donefer and Roman Bartkiw: Mirror, Mirror

January 9 – March 11, 2005

 

Artists from the Permanent Collection who paint: Scope

January 9 – February 6, 2005

 

Many To One

January – June, 2005

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2004

Carl, Ann and Anong Beam: It’s All Relative

October 9, 2004 – January 3, 2005

 

Karen Fletcher & Isabella Stefanescu: Ètudes/Studies: Two Ways of Working from a Model

October 9, 2004 -January 3, 2005

 

Susan Collett and Laurent Craste: Winifred Shantz Award Past Winners

September 16, 2004 -January 3, 2005

From Hands to Lips

August 5 – October 3, 2004

 

Heather Wood and John Kepkiewicz: Form and Surface: A Survey of Thorn Glass 1984 – 2004

July 3 – September 25, 2004

 

2004 Graduating Class from Sheridan College Glass Studio: In Direction

April 10 – June 20, 2004

 

Ione Thorkelsson: Fragments and 2 partial reconstructions

March 6 – June 17, 2004

 

Recent Acquisitions

March 6 – June 17, 2004

 

From the Permanent Collection

March 6 – June 17, 2004

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2003

Mark Thompson: Autonomous Glassworks

November 29 – February 22, 2004

 

Island Inspirations from Bornholm

September 13 – November 16, 2003

 

Magnifying Glass – Contemporary Canadian Glass

September 13 – November 16, 2003

 

Genius Loci – 10th Anniversary Exhibition

May 24 – August 31, 2003

 

Jonas Stonkus: Arcadian Lights

January 11 – May 11, 2003

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2002

10th National Biennial of Ceramics: Autoportrait

September 14 – December 24, 2002

 

Kye-Yeon Son: Reliquary for the Heart

September 14 – December 24, 2002

 

Susan Low-Beer: Rocksbreath II

June 25 – August 31, 2002

 

Brian McArthur & Dawn Detarando: Romantic Woodland Caribou

June 15 – August 31, 2002

 

TEMMOKU: Iron rich glazes in Canadian use

June 14 – August 31, 2002

 

Sarah Link: FARM

April 20 – August 31, 2002

 

Jim Thomson: Fire At Both Ends

January 12 – March 31, 2002

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2001 and earlier

History of Exhibitions 1993 – 2001